Amazing Solar Farm

 

In the Mojave Desert in California near Primm, Nevada. The largest solar thermal power-tower system in the world, owned by NRG Energy, Google and BrightSource Energy. It uses 347,000 computer-controlled mirrors to focus sunlight onto boilers on top of three 459-foot towers, where water is heated to produce steam to power turbines providing power to more than 140,000 California homes.
 

 

 
Solar panels sit in an array at the Southwick Estate Solar Farm, operated by Primrose Solar Ltd., near Fareham, U.K.   The plant, situated in 200 acres (81 hectares) of farmland, consists of 175,000 monocrystalline PV modules and has a capacity of 48 megawatts.
 
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India has gone ahead and built the world’s biggest solar power plant.

The Kamuthi Solar Power Project in Tamil Nadu has a 648 megawatt capacity — or enough to power 150,000 homes — topping the 550 megawatts of power produced by California’s Topaz Solar Farm.

The Kamuthi facility has 2.5 million solar panels which are cleaned daily by solar-powered robots.
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Renewable energy on the Canary Islands

 
Within Europe, Spain is one of the leading nations when it comes to the use of renewable energy. One of the government’s goals is for the El Hierro, one of the Canary Islands, to soon become 100 percent reliant on clean energy from wind and hydro power. If it were to reach that goal, El Hierro would be the first island in the world to meet its energy needs without burning any fossil fuels.

 

 
 
The greenest island in the world?
El Hierro, the Canary Island aiming for 100% clean energy

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Geothermal Energy in Iceland

 
 
What does a country do when it has too much clean energy?
If a country has an overabundance of a globally coveted product, should it export it or keep the product for its own use? That is the question that Icelanders are grappling with regarding to the country’s vast and overabundant supply of clean energy.

 

 

 

During the course of the 20th century, Iceland went from what was one of Europe’s poorest countries, dependent upon peat and imported coal for its energy, to a country with a high standard of living where practically all stationary energy is derived from renewable resources. In 2014, roughly 85% of primary energy use in Iceland came from indigenous renewable resources. Thereof 66% was from geothermal.

Today, about 9/10 households are heated with geothermal energy.

http://www.nea.is/geothermal/

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Geothermal Energy in Central America

 

The basic reason for Central America’s geothermal energy riches can be summed up in one word: volcanoes

Even more impressive is the amount of geothermal energy that Central Americans have under foot, but so far failed to exploit. World Bank reports indicate that the countries of the region may have up to 25 times more geothermal energy than they are currently using, and that geothermal power alone could cost-effectively satisfy their entire electricity demand.

Source

 

Geothermal Energy in Central America:

 
Geothermal Power Plant, El Salvador