Some Urban Farming Facts

 
 
99 Urban Farming Facts you did not know

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Vertical farming and how it works

 
 
 

 
Are Vertical Farms The Future Of Agriculture?
 

 

Notable vertical farms:
 

 

 
FarmedHere Grand Opening: The World’s Largest Aquaponics System
 

 
How FarmedHere uses aquaponics to serve customers locally produced food
 

 
Mirai corp [Japan] indoor farming
 

 
Earthrise – Japan’s Future Farms
 

 
AeroFarms, Newark
 

 

Related topics:

World’s Largest Indoor Farm is 100 Times More Productive
How To Make $100,000 Farming 1/2 An Acre You Don’t Own…
5 Ways Vertical Farms Are Changing the Way We Grow Food
Vertical farming explained: how cities could be food producers of the future

 
 
Critics:

Vertical farms: Wrong on so many levels

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

10 Companies That Control The World’s Food

 

ABF 1
 
Associated British Foods plc
http://www.abf.co.uk/
> Revenue: $21.1 billion
> Advertising spending: N/A
> Profits: $837 million
> Employees: 112,652

Associated British Foods is a U.K. food manufacturer that has built out a global presence largely through acquisitions. Associated British Foods operates sugar factories, sells food ingredients to wholesale and industry customers, and manufactures consumer products such as Mazola corn oil and Twinings tea. According to Oxfam, the company received low marks for its practices in water use, having failed to conduct impact assessments, while also failing to adopt strong practices in managing its water supply chain.

 
CoCa Cola Co

The Coca-Cola Company
> Revenue: $46.9 billion
> Advertising spending: $3.0 billion
> Profits: $8.6 billion
> Employees: 130,600

Coca-Cola is among the most valuable brands in the world. In total, Coca-Cola and its bottlers sold sold 28.2 billion cases worth of drinks, of which 47% were “trademark Coca-Cola.” In total, sales for The Coca-Cola Company were nearly $47 billion in its latest fiscal year. Overall, The Coca-Cola Company scores well for a number of practices, including addressing inequality for women working in production and supporting female empowerment for workers in its supply chain. The company is also well-rated for its land-management practices.

 
DANONE

Groupe Danone S.A.
> Revenue: $29.3 billion
> Advertising spending: $1.2 billion
> Profits: $2.0 billion
> Employees: 104,642

France’s Groupe Danone has a truly global presence. Its largest market, by sales, is Russia, followed by France, the U.S., China, and Indonesia. According to the company, Danone is the world’s largest seller of fresh dairy products, which accounted for 11.8 billion euros in revenue, or over half of the company’s total sales in 2013. Danone is also among the world’s largest sellers of early life nutrition products and bottled waters. Danone received high scores for its policies in a number of major issues, including transparency and managing water resources. However, the company also received low scores in other policies, including its handling of land and farming issues. Danone received the lowest score of any company from Oxfam for its policies regarding women’s issues in agricultural production.

 
GM

General Mills, Inc.
> Revenue: $17.9 billion
> Advertising spending: $1.1 billion
> Profits: $1.8 billion
> Employees: 43,000

General Mills owns a number of America’s best-known brands, including Betty Crocker, Green Giant, and Pillsbury. No company received a lower rating from Oxfam for its overall approach to major policy issues. General Mills had the lowest scores in awareness and policies regarding climate change. Recently, however, General Mills announced new initiatives designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in its supply chain. As part of the announcement, General Mills also pledged to implement specific emissions targets, to review supplier practices, and to name its largest suppliers of palm oil and sugar in order to improve transparency.

 
KELLOGGS

Kellogg Company
> Revenue: $14.8 billion
> Advertising spending: $1.1 billion
> Profits: $1.8 billion
> Employees: 30,277

Among the top food companies, Kellogg is the smallest by revenue. Still, as of 2013, the company had nearly $15 billion in sales, a similar amount in total assets, and more than 30,000 employees. Kellogg also owns a large number of very well-known brands, including Kellogg’s cereal, Keebler, and Pringles, which it acquired in 2012 for $2.7 billion. According to Kellogg, it is the world’s leading cereal company and the second-largest maker of cookies. In all, Kellogg makes 1,600 different foods, which it sells in more than 180 different countries. Kellogg received a lower overall rating from Oxfam for its practices than all but two of the other 10 companies. However, in a recent release, Oxfam praised Kellogg for its pledge to cut greenhouse emissions in its supply chain.

 
MARS

Mars, Incorporated
> Revenue: $33.0 billion
> Advertising spending: $2.2 billion
> Profits: N/A
> Employees: 60,000

Mars is the the only one of the world’s 10 largest food companies that is privately owned. Mars owns several well-known chocolate brands, such as M&Ms, Milky Way, Snickers and Twix. Mars also owns a range of food brands such as Uncle Ben’s rice, as well as chewing gum and candy-maker Wrigley. Among the big 10 global food companies, Mars received the lowest policy ratings for water and land issues. In both cases, Oxfam penalized the company for its lack of knowledge of its environmental impact, as well as for its supplier policies.

 
MONDELEZ

Mondelez International, Inc.
> Revenue: $35.3 billion
> Advertising spending: $1.9 billion
> Profits: $3.9 billion
> Employees: 107,000

In 2012, Kraft Foods split into two separate companies, Kraft Foods Group and Mondelez. While Kraft Foods Group took North American grocery brands, Mondelez took its snacks and candies brands, which include Cadbury, Nabisco, Oreo, and Trident, among many others. The company had over $35 billion in revenue and more than $72 billion in assets as of last year. It also employed 100,000 workers worldwide. According to Oxfam, Mondelez received low marks for its transparency, as well as for its handling of issues related to climate change and workers.

 
NESTLE

Nestle S.A.
> Revenue: $103.5 billion
> Advertising spending: $3.0 billion
> Profits: $11.2 billion
> Employees: 333,000

By many measures, Nestle is the largest of the 10 food companies, with more than 92 billion Swiss francs in revenue last year — net profit and total asset figures that dwarf other food companies — and roughly 333,000 employees. Nestle is also the top-rated company by Oxfam for its approach to major policy issues. It received the highest scores for addressing transparency, water use, and climate change of any major food company. In its 2013 report, Oxfam highlighted Nestle’s efforts in addressing labor abuses the company discovered in its cocoa supply chain in the Ivory Coast.

 
PEPSICO

PepsiCo Inc.
> Revenue: $66.4 billion
> Advertising spending: $2.5 billion
> Profits: $6.7 billion
> Employees: 274,000

In addition to owning famous soda brands such as Pepsi, Mountain Dew, and Gatorade, PepsiCo also controls food brands such as Tostitos, Doritos, and Quaker. PepsiCo also employed nearly a quarter of a million people worldwide at the end of 2013. Pepsi was among the world’s biggest advertisers. Advertising Age estimates that PepsiCo’s worldwide media spending totalled $2.5 billion in 2012. According to three groups that measure brand value — Interbrand, BrandZ, and CoreBrand — Pepsi is one of the world’s most valuable brands in any industry. While PepsiCo received a lower score on policy issues than three other companies reviewed by Oxfam, it has developed a reputation for company responsibility in at least one area. CEO Indra Nooyi has pushed for healthier products in her time at the helm of the company.

 
Unilever

Unilever Group
> Revenue: $68.5 billion
> Advertising spending: $7.4 billion
> Profits: $6.7 billion
> Employees: 174,381

Unilever products are hardly limited to food and drinks. The U.K.- and Netherlands-based group also makes personal care and home care products. Still, its foods and refreshments businesses accounted for almost 23 billion euros of the company’s nearly 50 billion euros in revenue last year. Brands owned by Unilever include Lipton tea, Hellmann’s mayonnaise, and Ben & Jerry’s ice cream, to name only a few. Unilever generally scores fairly well for its efforts in addressing policy issues. Oxfam rated it above all other companies for its worker and farming policies. Only Nestle received a higher overall rating for its handling of the issues highlighted by Oxfam.

 
Read more at 24/7 Wall St.

Associated British Foods
The Coca-Cola Company
Groupe Danone
General Mills
Kellogg’s
Mars, Incorporated
Mondelēz International
Nestlé
PepsiCo
Unilever
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Common foods kids hate, but love them later in life

 

Which foods did you hate as a kid but love them as a grown up?

While the foods in the list below may not apply to you specifically, it’s a general round-up of common foods kids tend to hate about … but love later in life.

Surprisingly, top of the ‘hate list’ is now the avocado.

Dr Wendy Doyle, of the British Dietetic Association, said:
‘I suspect that avocado comes out as the most hated food more because of its unusual texture, rather than the taste.

 

Suggest food items that did not make the list.

AVOCADO

Leeks

LEEKS

Marrow

MARROW

Melon

MELON

Cottage cheese

COTTAGE CHEESE

Broccoli

BROCCOLI

Whole Wheat Bread

WHOLE WEAT BREAD

Spinach

SPINACH

Collard Greens

COLLARD GREENS

Brussels Spouts

BRUSSELS SPROUTS

Coffee

COFFEE

Blue Cheese

BLUE CHEESE

Eggplant

EGGPLANT

Cauliflower

CAULIFLOWER

Radish

RADISH

Fish

FISH

Beets

BEETS

Lima Beans

LIMA BEANS

Booze

BOOZE

Arugula

ARAGULA

Green Beans

GREEN BEANS

Lentils

LENTILS

Tomato

TOMATO

Beans

BEANS

Mushrooms

MUSHROOMS

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

7 Foods That Reduce Your Alzheimer’s Risk

 
Researchers found that a cocoa extract – called lavado – may reduce or block damage to nerve pathways found in patients with Alzheimer’s disease.

Could a cocoa extract prevent Alzheimer’s?
Lavado: Cocoa Extract Preparation May Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease
 

1. Walnuts (And Almonds, Pecans, Hazelnuts)
Walnuts might be small in size, but they pack a big nutritional punch. They are filled with Omega-3 fatty acids, the good kind of fat your brain needs. A study from the New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities found that mice given a diet including walnuts showed improvement in memory and motor coordination. Walnuts also contain vitamin E and flavonoids, which can help protect the brain.

2. Salmon (And Mackerel, Sardines, Other Fatty Fish)
Also high in Omega-3s, fatty fish like salmon can lower blood levels of beta-amyloid, a protein thought to play a role in Alzheimer’s. A Columbia University study found that the more Omega-3 fatty acids a person eats, the lower their blood beta-amyloid levels. Dr. Nussbaum suggests eating 8 oz. of fish per week—fresh fish is best, but you can also talk to your doctor about taking a fish oil supplement.

Eating fish, chicken, nuts may lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease

3. Berries
“Antioxidants are like taking out the broom in the spring and sweeping the garage,” Dr. Nussbaum says. “Antioxidants are the body’s broom.” Berries contain polyphenols, a type of antioxidant which helps stop inflammation and allows brain cells to work better. A Tufts University study found that berries can reverse slow-downs in the brain’s ability to process information.

“You can’t go wrong if a food has the word ‘berry’ in the name,” says Dr. Nussbaum. “Strawberries, blueberries, cranberries— they’re all good for your brain.”

4. Spinach (And Kale, Other Leafy Greens)
Full of antioxidants and fiber, leafy greens should be a diet staple. In a national study, women in their 60s who ate more leafy vegetables over time did better than their non-greens-eating counterparts on memory, verbal, and other tests. And new studies show that high levels of vitamin C, which is found in spinach, may help with dementia prevention.

Spinach, Broccoli May Help Keep the Brain Young….

5. Turmeric
Break out the curry! A host of studies have shown that turmeric, the spice used in curries, and its main active component curcumin, can help prevent Alzheimer’s. In one such study, researchers from UCLA found that vitamin D3, taken with curcumin, may help the immune system to get rid of the amino acids that form the plaque in the brain that’s associated with Alzheimer’s Disease. So the next time you cook, incorporate this healthy spice.

6. Coffee
Now you don’t have to feel guilty about pouring yourself another cup. Researchers from the University of South Florida and University of Miami found that people older than 65 who drank three cups of coffee a day (i.e. had higher blood levels of caffeine) developed Alzheimer’s disease two to four years later than their counterparts with lower caffeine levels, and that caffeine had a positive impact even in older adults who were already showing early signs of Alzheimer’s.

http://health.usf.edu/nocms/publicaffairs/now/pdfs/JAD111781.pdf

7. Chocolate
If you haven’t already switched from milk chocolate to dark, now you have one more reason to. Compelling research already shows that dark chocolate, which contains flavonoids (a plant compound that helps with the body’s circulation), can help combat heart disease, but flavonoids may also help slow down the effects of dementia. In an Italian study, older adults who had mild symptoms of dementia drank cocoa with high, medium and low amounts of flavonoids. Those who consumed high amounts outperformed those who consumed low doses on cognitive tests.

And a study is currently underway by the National Institute on Aging to see whether resveratrol, a compound found in chocolate, red wine, and grapes, can prevent dementia. One tip: A healthy choice is dark chocolate that has a 70% or higher cocoa content.